Friday, September 21, 2018

HURRAY EX-PRESIDENT CARTER

I remember his inauguration day.



He shunned pomp of the presidency, even carried his own suitcase onto Air Force One, and has maintained that same humility since he left the White House in 1981. Former Presidents join corporate boards of directors and usually sign lucrative book deals. Carter said, "I didn't want to  capitalize on being in the White House. It has never been my ambition to be rich."

He lives with wife Rosalyn in the two-bedroom ranch house in Plains which they built in 1961. He teaches Sunday School at the local Baptist church. Today, at 93, he does household chores like washing the dishes after he and Rosalyn cook dinner -- does charity work in Plains, as well as at his headquarters in Atlanta, while helping restore homes with his own hammer and tool belt, for "Habitat for Humanity." He stays on the peanut farm where he grew up during the Great Depression because  "I can't imagine living anywhere else. We feel at home here--the folks in town, when we need it, they take care of us."

He writes in a garage attached to their house. His books include: "Palestine Peace Not Apartheid,"  "An Hour Before Daylight," "Our Endangered Values." (Received a "Best Spoken Word" Grammy Award for his recording of "Our Endangered Values." In March his latest book "Faith" was published and is now a best seller. Publicizing it he appeared on the late show.



Wowy wow! This very senior Senior Citizen -- his keenness, powerful sense of right and wrong and sense of humor -- he gets me looking forward to tomorrow, and gives me hope about growing older, working, writing/talking about what's on my mind till the very end of life arrives.



Monday, September 17, 2018

MY MOTHER'S BIRTHDAY



Today is the day I celebrate my mother's birthday. There's a green light glowing in her brass candle holder. It's electrified, and sits on a shelf above my desk. The nurse, who tended Mom, during the last weeks of her life, sent it to me. I keep it lit night and day.

Throughout my life, Mom was always there for me -- it didn't take much conversation -- just "Mom, I've got a problem," or "Mom, I'm not sure what to do," or just "Hi Mom." (I've blogged about her in "Night Light" -- 4/13, and in " Marching" --  4/17.)


After a head-on collision on the highway near Indianapolis, I was rushed to a hospital -- cut out of my clothes, temporarily repaired -- my small intestine had been severed by the seat belt, my facial injuries were extensive. Because I had a fever, surgeons postponed the major surgery that was needed on my back.

For the next three weeks, I was strapped to a Stryker table. The nurses turned it and me like a flap-jack, every 45 minutes. I couldn't sit up, or raise my head, or move any part of my torso, though I could move  my arms and hands. I lay on my bandaged stomach wounds, facing the floor, then lay face up with my injured back (at the waist), positioned over the padded hole in the center of the table.

My husband, John Cullum, and Mom arrived while I was still unconscious. He was in "1776" on Broadway singing "Molasses to Rum," playing the Senator from South Carolina. While I was being treated with antibiotics for the fever, the show's producer let him miss performances and fly to Indianapolis twice a week. The shows he missed weren't deducted from his salary. The cast members had a kitty -- money they collected to help cover the cost of the airfare.

Mom, who was recovering from a mastectomy she had a few months earlier, was with me every day. She got me large-size knitting needles, white yarn, and cast on thirty stitches, so that upside-down or right-side up, I could knit. With her encouraging me, I managed to make the first four inches of a scarf that my husband even now, occasionally wears.

The Doctors came in routinely, and tested my legs, arms, face as well as my private parts with a feather, asking, "Do you feel that?" Though I didn't feel anything, I always said, "I can march."

It seemed to cheer everyone when I said that. An orderly had told me I was temporarily paralyzed. Someone had murmured "partial paraplegia." I didn't have a dictionary, but if I had one, I wouldn't have looked up paraplegia or fracture. No one said your back is broken -- they just said that the lumbar vertebrae at my waist were "fractured."

It took all my energy to concentrate on minutes passing between pills and the hospital routines that had to do with food, toilet, bathing, combing my hair. I didn't ask for a mirror -- I didn't want to see what I looked like. Watching the clock ... what a torture it was, staring at the second hand, watching the minute hand, waiting for the hour hand to move. Only after three-and-a-half hours had past, could I start asking for the pills that let me disappear for a while.

It was a orderly who noticed a reddish, swollen area on my arm. A sliver of glass, probably from the shattered windshield of the car, was removed and treated. By the next day, the fever was gone.

JC was onstage in New York when the two surgeons examined me head-to-toe with a needle, instead of feather. Frowning, one of them said, "Well, we can operate in the morning. The other surgeon smiled, and joked -- "I'm the best bone fixer around town -- this is the hospital where we fix the racers from the Indy 500.  My friend here is a neurological specialist -- best in the country, figuring out nerve endings."

I tried to say something about marching. The way they were talking -- one frowning, the other smiling -- frightened me. They said ... maybe a year ... two years ... maybe five ... hope for best ... "Wheelchair" was mentioned twice.

After they left, Mom pulled her chair in. Squeezing my hand, she said, "Recovering from surgery is easier than waiting like you've been waiting. What you need to do is get a good night's sleep, and wake up strong, looking forward to the operation."

"Is that what you did, Mom?" She'd hadn't mentioned her mastectomy. I was thinking ... five years ... wheelchair ...  hope for the best ...  I wanted to say I don't want to live if I'm going to be in a wheelchair.

Mom spoke softly. "Don't think about what you fear. Try to give yourself to the doctors, dear, like you'd give yourself to a lover." She kissed me, and said it again, louder and very clearly. "The doctors need you to trust them, dear.  It will help them, if you give yourself to them like you'd give yourself to a lover."

I had never talked about lovers or my love life with my mother. How did my mother, married to my father -- for so many years the hard-working, faithful, adoring, good wife -- find the knowledge, the words, the wisdom to say what she did? And help me -- give me the command, and then, the power to look forward to tomorrow.

Happy birthday, Mom -- you gave me health, a body, resilience, a healing capacity, a powerful life force that's in my bones, my muscles, my blood, my skin, my pores, and you were always, always, always there when I needed you.''

Thursday, September 13, 2018

(VIDEO) WHAT DOES JOHN CULLUM WISH FOR?

Emily Frankel's question, "What do you wish for" (usually a fun topic) becomes an SERIOUS topic.


What John says gets the Cullums sharing what truly worries them.



Sunday, September 9, 2018

SERENA-THE WINNER-WILLIAMS

Serena Williams has been sharing her personal story of what she's been though, in order to be what she is in this picture -- a very beautiful mother holding her very beautiful daughter.



In Time Magazine (August 27) with her face on the cover, she talked about her fear that she isn't a good enough mother. She described how becoming a Mother led to a pulmonary embolism and hematoma that required multiple surgeries.  Serena said, "I went through hell to have Alexis Olympia Ohanian, who is in fact, (she bragged) already learning to count the stairs in French."

After six weeks in bed, too weak to get up, detailing her schedule, her exercises -- how she struggled to regain her strength -- Serena revealed how arduous it was, after a difficult childbirth at age 36, to take on a global championship as an athlete who has reached stardom.

That is exactly what what Serena is doing right now at the U.S.Open Tennis finals in Forest Hills. She has a team surrounding her, guiding her,  an adoring husband, the owner and founder of Reddit, Alexis Ohanian, also a fitness guru, along with her agent, her coach, and a fashion expert who works with her on everything that has to do with how she looks.

Since the tight-fitting (to prevent blood clots) "black-panther body suit" she wore at the French Open was banned, we have been seeing her everyday in ballerina "tutu "outfits.

Here's the blue tutu.

My husband, (tennis nut John Cullum) seeing Serena in this black tutu, finds the outfits a bit silly,

Serena's determination to win can be seen in everything she has been doing, is now doing more than ever -- her fund-raising charities for domestic abuse victims and children -- as an author of several published books, she recently announced she's writing a TV show storyline, which will be converted into script form by her agency.

Reading and rereading various other biographies, I sense that everything she does has to do with  childhood dreams that have shaped her and become her plan -- to do everything at the top most, highest level and win -- win -- win.

This woman knows tennis -- knows everything there is to know about the game and winning. You can't win without learning about losing. Winning or losing, she will find more and more more things to win.